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Curtin University
Collaborative Research in Art, Science and Humanity

symposium morning teaContemporary Imaging Symposium

Collaborative Research in Art, Science and Humanities (CRASH) Symposium at Staffroom
School of Art and Design Exhibition, hosted by School of Design and Art.

Download Quicktime Player to listen to a podcast of this symposium.
Click on the presentation titles below to listen to them.

Presentations
Introduction
Dr Julian Goddard, Senior Lecturer and Head of School, School of Design and Art, Curtin University

Nanoshifts -Reconfiguration of Material Agency
Dr Paul Thomas, Associate Professor Senior, Department of Art, School of Design and Art, Curtin University
The presentation will focus on research in the area Nanotechnology and the role that it is having in redirecting the way we sense the material world. The focus on how art is rethinking its ocularcentrisity and the agency of its material constructs. The privileged position that art has held is being challenged by nanotechnology; confronting the very core of its relationship with the material world.

Thinktank: Future ARI Generator
Dr Darryn Ansted, Coordinator of Painting, Department of Art, School of Design and Art, Curtin University
This presentation outlines the transformation of a nondescript triangular room in Bentley into a cutting edge research space that will contribute to the broader community and aid in the training of curators.

Beyond the Limits of Traditional Visual Computing Models
Joel Louie, PhD Candidate, Department of Art, School of Design and Art,
Curtin University
The Graphical User Interface has been the dominant paradigm for decades but the modern interface approaches like multi-touch (Apple iOS), gestural (Nintendo Wii) and movement tracking (Microsoft Kinect) herald an exciting time for alternative interaction modalities. Joel Louie's research explores the Tangible User Interface (TUI) through the corporeal frameworks articulated by movement theorist Rudolf Laban's concepts of “touch” and “effort shape” and phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty's notion of “the phenomenal body”.

Data and Imaging Technology
Bryan J Mather, Ph D Candidate, Department of Art, School of Design and Art, Curtin University
Bryan Mather's research explores computer language structure and its effect on digital reality. This paper examines the dominant view that places “data” as separate from the algorithmic translation of data; that data is a collection of facts or truths that we reinterpret or mediate into images. Notions of truth and data, and offer a view on the critique of the image and its relationship to the underlying technologies.

Imagining and Imaging the Other Side of the World.
Susanna Castleden, Lecturer and Coordinator of Printmedia, Department of Art, School of Design and Art, Curtin University. PhD Candidate at RMIT University)
This presentation looks at ways in which the world has been imaged and imagined through a variety of mapping processes. I examine a series of maps and artworks as a way of reflecting on how we interpret and understand the visible and invisible world given the current accessibility and abundance of new mapping technologies.

Transmuted Signal: The image as information channel
Jan Lawrence Andruszkiewicz, M Phil Candidate,  Department of Art, School of Design and Art, Curtin University
Jan Andruszkiewicz's research focuses on Information complexity and creative practice. In his exegesis he deals with how to re-imagne visual information complexity. He takes a creative approach to information entropy, perception, identification and understanding.

Multiple-Views our Problematic Contemporary Relationship to Reality
Nicole Slatter, Lecturer and Co-coordinator of First Year, Department of Art, School of Design and Art, Curtin University and PhD Candidate, RMIT
This paper will discuss the work of Pierre Huyghe and the process of developing understandings of place through multiple formats and visualisations. Contemporary experiences of place are impacted by variety of image and information sources available to describe narrative, time and space.

Spatial Representation in Architecture -Spatial Communication
hrough the Use of Sound

 Errol L Tout, PhD, Senior Lecturer, Department of Architecture and Interior Architecture, Curtin University
Dr Errol Tout suggests that Architecture is not only a visual and physical phenomenon but also an instrument that tempers and constructs our sound perceptions of the world. This working premise draws our attention to the significance of how 'aural representation' contributes to forming an understanding of a work of architecture and how architectural space conditions not only how we see the world but also how we hear it. Can sound be used to tell audience things about space that, perhaps, images cannot?

Architecture & the Ornamental - Two Current Projects
 Pam Gaunt, Senior Lecturer and Academic Coordinator, Department of Art, School of Design and Art, Curtin University
Pam Gaunt's presentation will focus on two projects she is currently working on with Donaldson & Warn architects and PlanE Landscape Architects in building integrated art work in Kings Park. Both projects involve cutting edge interventions in/with technology such as electrochromic glass.

Radical Pleasure
Dr Julian Goddard, Senior Lecturer and Head of School, School of Design and Art, Curtin University
This paper looks at the recent collapse of the boundaries between of Art/Design/Architecture and argues for the reinstatement of a radical praxis within the everyday through an old school Marxist critique of production and consumption. The twist in the argument is in the way in which this new attack on consumption is framed -not through revolutionary emancipatory rhetoric but through a reinvigoration of the subversive potential of pleasure. 'If it feels good it must be good!'