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Collaborative Research in Art, Science and Humanity

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EXHIBITION: THE WORLD IS EVERYTHING THAT IS THE CASE


The World Is Everything That Is The Case

LOCATION
John Curtin Gallery, Building 200, Curtin University, Kent Street, Bentley Western Australia 6102

DATE
31st May - 3rd August 2012

CURATORIATE
Sean Cubitt, Vince Dziekan & Paul Thomas

CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS
Karen Casey, Mark Cypher, Tina Gonsalves, Mark Guglielmetti, Nigel Helyer & Mitchell Whitelaw

Exhibition Catalogue. (PDF Format)

From the portable museum to the make-shift stand of the street corner trader, the migrant’s battered suitcase tied with string acts as an echo of Wittgenstein: “The World is everything that is the case”.

The suitcase which is also the table where the three-card trick draws in the punters, or where the gains get played away on endless trains across the countless borders of Europe and Asia. The "boite-en-valise" of the import-export man (the artist?), the smuggler (the curator?) and his knowing innocence, the ‘who me?’ look, and the ready lie. Artist as itinerant trader; the artwork as migratory, both ready to make their case given half a chance.

In this case, the exhibition (assuming the form and conceit of the portmanteau) explores the migratory nature of artistic practice to act as a global mediation between the aesthetics of trade along the peregrine, wandering routes that lead towards meaning.

The case (suitcase) is explored as a space that embodies (contains?) the transformation of cultural practice under contemporary aesthetic conditions, occurring across states, borders and demarcation zones of continuous production. The suitcase is self contained and its consignment compressed ("zipped"); curation operates as CODEC. When uncompressed, its contents manifest the spatial science of the Multiple.

Each of the artists included (in the case; in this case) have been approached to contribute a work designed to toggle between materialities and modes of display (the "material manifest", the pixel-as-container). So demonstrated, the curatorial project is predicated upon "unpacking" the tensions that are brought into existence and amplified between:
- containment and the uncontainable (contents contained inside other containers, inside other containers, inside… other…)
- the sited (placed, in transit, holding areas) and unsighted (invisible, unforeseen, non-visual)
- the revelation of the deep focus X-ray scan of carry-on luggage (inspection, materials discrimination, detection; scanning, optimizing, visualizing). and the portmanteau (the "under-meaning" of the double entendre; deceptive, inconspicuous; what remains hidden, undetected, lurking in the shadows).



FORUM: EXPERIMENTAL NEW-MEDIA
Friday 1 June
Bankwest Theatre, John Curtin Gallery
1 - 4:30pm

Focusing on the works and ideas presented in Dennis Del Favero: Magnesium Light and The World Is Everything That is The Case, the speakers will discuss the curatorial premise and how experimental new-media presents opportunities for global interaction and expression.

Dennis Del Favero: Magnesium Light
Experimental new-media artist Dennis Del Favero presents Magnesium Light, a two-part video project investigating the interrelationship between war and identity.
In You and I, Del Favero engages with the possible fantasies that surrounded the infamous Abu Ghraib photographs of 2006. Todtnauberg is a video work dealing with the encounter in 1969 between the Jewish poet and Holocaust survivor Paul Celan and the German philosopher and Nazi collaborator Martin Heidegger in 1969.

The World is Everything That is the Case
Developed for the ISEA2011 Istanbul exhibition Uncontained, this exhibition explores the use of a traditional suitcase as a paradoxical transmigratory symbol. The suitcase is analogous to transportation and distribution, packing and unpacking, compression and the uncompressed. The suitcase is inextricably linked to the use of telecommunications, databases and digital media, which through its compressed shipment of information can impose on the location, culture and immateriality of cyberspace, a parallel culture of sameness to those suitcases of the early explorers and the migrants that followed.

1.00pm
Paul Thomas, co-curator of The World is Everything That is The Case, will introduce the session (15mins), Bankwest Theatre

1.15pm
Dennis Del Favero, participating artist, will speak about his Magnesium Light project plus other recent works (45 mins) Bankwest Theatre NB: STILL TO BE CONFIRMED

2.00pm
Mark Cypher, participating artist, will discuss his work, Propositions 2.0 (20 min floortalk)

2.20pm
Karen Casey, participating artist, will discuss her work Meditation Wall and the Global Mind Project (20 min floortalk)

2.50pm
Break for refreshments (20 mins)

3.10pm
Vince Dziekan, co-curator of The World is Everything That is The Case, will discuss the project (20 mins) - Bankwest Theatre

3.30pm
Nigel Helyer (aka Dr Sonique) will discuss his sound installation Weeping Willow (20 min floortalk)

4.00/4:30 pm
Questions/finish

CTRL-Z: WRITING IN THE AGE OF NEW MEDIA

Presented by the Centre for Culture & Technology (CCAT)
& Fremantle Arts Centre

Sat 19 November 12:30-6:00pm
@ Fremantle Arts Centre

Bar Open
Canapes Provided

Tickets:
$20 in advance from FAC
$25 on the day (subject to availability)

Artworks by Benjamin Forster
Installation by Robert Briggs & Niall Lucy
Live Music by The Morning Night

In the age of personal computers, the Internet, mobile phones, Facebook, Twitter, Word, Photoshop, SMS, email, desktop- and e-publishing, blogging and fan fiction, autocorrect and track changes, who -- or what -- is a writer?

Ctrl-Z is an arts symposium aimed at exploring the possibilities of writing in the age of new media. While the means and opportunities for writing are seemingly forever multiplying, can the same be said for the ways in which we think about what we call writing, or what we call a writer? How, today, does writing take shape: how is it produced, published, distributed and read? How might we account for cultural anxieties over the ill-effects or improper uses of new writing technologies (illiteracy, plagiarism, piracy, cyberbullying), and how might we imagine new ways of thinking about creativity, technology and communication?

Featuring panel discussions, video screenings, exhibitions, live music and more, Ctrl-Z will appeal to anyone with a professional or personal interest in writing as a cultural and communicative practice -- from humanities academics, postgraduates and English and Media teachers to authors, artists and creative media practitioners; from arts patrons to general readers. Cutting across academic, professional and public divides, Ctrl-Z will present an engaging and entertaining occasion to reflect on what it means -- now -- to write and to be a writer.

Guests & contributors
Mark Amerika Professor of Art & Art History (University of Colorado at Boulder). A Time Magazine 100 Innovator, Amerika is a pioneer of new media art and writing, and founder of ALT-X online publishing in the US. His digital artwork has been exhibited in major galleries around the world, and his writings on art are collected in META/DATA: A Digital Poetics and remixthebook. His novels include The Kafka Chronicles; Sexual Blood; and 29 Inches.

Robert Briggs Senior Lecturer in Mass Communication (Curtin University), co-editor of Manufacturing Consent? and founding co-editor of Ctrl-Z: new media philsophy.

Claire Colebrook (virtual presenter) Professor of Literary Theory at Penn State University. Her books include Ethics and Representation; Gilles Deleuze; Milton, Evil and Literary History; and Blake, Deleuzian Aesthetics and the Digital.

Benjamin Forster Founding member of Canberra-based interdisciplinary arts collective, Last Man to Die. His work has been exhibited at FAC, PICA and in Canada.

John Kinsella (virtual presenter) Professor of English (UWA/Cambridge) and award-winning, internationally acclaimed poet, novelist, editor and critic.

Tama Leaver Academic blogger and digital media scholar (Curtin University), and author of Artificial Culture: Identity, Technology, Bodies. His blog Tamar Leaver dot Net is archived by the National Library of Australia.

Niall Lucy Professor of Critical Theory (Curtin University), broadcaster, media commentator and founding co-editor of Ctrl-Z: new media philosophy. His books include A Derrida Dictionary; Beyond Semiotics: Text, Culture and Technology; and Pomo Oz: Fear and Loathing Downunder.

Catharine Lumby Professor of Journalism and Media Research (University of New South Wales) and media commentator. Her books include The Porn Report; Alvin Purple; Bad Girls: The Media, Sex and Feminism in the 90s; and Why TV is Good for Kids: Raising 21st Century Children.

Suvendrini Perera Professor of Cultural Studies (Curtin University), media commentator and author of Australia and the Insular Imagination: Beaches, Borders, Boats, and Bodies.

Georgia Richter Commissioning Editor of adult fiction, creative non-fiction and poetry (Fremantle Press).

Anne Surma Distinguished Editor, Senior Lecturer in Literature and Writing (Murdoch University) and author of Public and Professional Writing: Ethics, Imagination and Rhetoric.

Darren Tofts Professor of Media & Communication (Swinburne University) and cultural critic. His books include Interzone: Media Arts in Australia; Parallax: Essays on Art, Culture and Technology; and Memory Trade: A Prehistory of Cyberculture.

Gregory Ulmer (virtual presenter) Professor of English (University of Florida) and Professor of Electronic Languages & Cybermedia (European Graduate School, Switzerland). His books include Teletheory: Grammatology in the Age of Video; Heuristics: The Logic of Invention; and Internet Invention: From Literacy to Electracy.

McKenzie Wark (virtual presenter) Chair of Culture & Media (The New School, New York) and media commentator. His books include A Hacker Manifesto; Gamer Theory; Celebrites, Culture and Cyberspace; and The Beach Beneath the Street: The Everyday Life and Glorious Times of the Situationist International.

& special guests
The Morning Night

PROGRAM
(Bar open all day)
1:00-1:15 OPENING ADDRESS
Welcome and introduction from event organisers, Niall Lucy and Robert Briggs

1:15-2:00 WRITING MEDIA
Panel discussion on the nature of authorship, art and creativity, and the history of writing technologies -- Darrent Tofts, Catharine Lumby, Niall Lucy, Mark Amerika

2:00-2:30 WRITING FREELY
Free time to interact with participants and attendees, to peruse exhibitions, and to view screenings of pre-recorded interviews and commentary from absent contributors -- McKenzie Wark, Claire Colebrook, Gregory Ulmer, John Kinsella

2:30-3:15 WRITING ANXIETIES
Panel discussion on moral panics over the impact of new technologies on a range of writing and social practices -- Catharine Lumby, Tama Leaver, Suvendi Perera, Robert Briggs

3:15-3:45 WRITING FREELY
Free time to interact with participants and attendees, to peruse exhibitions, and to view screenings of pre-recorded interviews and commentary from absent contributors -- McKenzie Wark, Claire Colebrook, Gregory Ulmer, John Kinsella

3:45-4:30 WRITING READERS
Panel discussion on new media publishing opportunities and challenges and the role of the reading public in the production of writing -- Georgia Richter, Anne Surma, Darren Tofts, Mark Amerika

4:30-5:30 WRITING ENTERTAINMENT
Complementary canapes and music by The Morning Night

The Leonardo Education and Art Forum Workshops

Transdisciplinary Visual Arts, Science & Technology Renewal Post-New Media Assimilation workshop
Leonardo Education and Art Forum: session two

Sponsored by the National Institute for Experimental Arts
Presented in collaboration with Rewire the Fourth International Conference on the Histories of Media Art, Science and Technology .

Location: Liverpool School of Art & Design, Liverpool John Moores University Art & Design Academy Duckinfield St, Off Brownlow Hill, Liverpool

DATE: 27th September

TIME: 2-5 pm

Workshop moderators:

Associate Professor Paul Thomas:, College of Fine Art, University of New South Wales;

Nina Czeglady: Senior Fellow, KMDI, University of Toronto, Adjunct Associate Professor, Concordia University, Montreal, Senior Fellow, Hungarian University of Fine Arts, Budapest.

Workshop Abstract:

Transdisciplinarity is deemed "radical", "provisional and opportunistic" because it challenges traditional educational paradigms. It focuses critical and creative attention onto domain-specific problem areas of "chance", "discontinuity" and "materiality" (Foucault, 1976) to transcend limits within established disciplinary knowledge practices. This enables (re)visioning of the role, activity and value of Art Schools in uniting the pedagogical and technological strengths of the humanities and sciences in a university context, utilising conceptual growth, experimental innovation, visual communication and flexible learning spaces to deliver a model of Transdisciplinarity.

The transdisciplinary model will be explored in the context of a trans-migratory role from Istanbul to Liverpool post the ISEA workshop and look for different voices from the various international institutional perspectives.

This workshop will address and share experiences and difficulties encountered while developing transdisciplinary art-science research, teaching, and when meshing curricula from diverse fields.

 

Working groups focus:

1. Discuss transdiciplinary colloborations

Working group leaders: Petra Gemeinboeck and Mike Phillips

2. Discuss transdiciplinary practice in the studio

Working group leaders: Ross Harley and Peter Ride

3. Discuss transdisciplinary theory

Working group leaders: Edward Colless and Wendy Coones

Aims: To identify and share ways to surmount some of the difficulties commonly encountered in interdisciplinary art/science practices and curricula with the aim of publishing a guide to effective models and best practices.

The LEAF international intend to publish an article based on the contributions by participants of transdiciplinary workshops 2011

Photos from the workshop by Joel Louie.

 

Focus Groups

Focus Group 1. Discuss transdiciplinary colloborations

PRESENTATION TITLE: transdisciplinary framework for research collaboration.

PRESENTER: Petra Gemeinboeck

TITLE: Dr

AFFILIATION: College of Fine Art, University of New South Wales

PAPER ABSTRACT

This presentation will explore how historically experimental arts practices seem to be particularly privileged for opening up and navigating via transdisciplinarity such a complex, slippery terrain. Yet we haven"t even opened "pandora's box" yet - asking the question of how transdisciplinary research can be practiced within the established institutional framework? This includes the issue of locating ones" research and related barriers with regards to funding and promotion. How can we develop and foster a horizontal, open transdisciplinary framework for research collaboration that perforates and transcends existing disciplinary boundaries within an institutional system where both resources and career paths are confined to vertically aligned, formally defined codes and practices?

 

PRESENTATION TITLE: Dirty Data

PRESENTER: Mike Phillips

TITLE: Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts

AFFILIATION: i-Dat University of Plymouth

PAPER ABSTRACT

 

Certainly, within the Earth Sciences, there is a fractious debate around the value, nature and meaning of "data". To the instrumentalists that measure the world data is something clean and uncorrupted by human hands. For them the data collected by people, through unmediated observation, citizen science processes and historic archives is described as "dirty" and therefore fallacious.

This divergence within a single disciplinary community does not bode well for the cultivation of interdisciplinary relationships where the amplification of difference may threaten to drown out opportunities for harmony.

Or could it be that this friction is the necessary ingredient to create the conditions to put the "Trans" into disciplinarity? Looking through and beyond the language of dispute to the materiality of the data it self to enable creative interventions that are mutually beneficial for the sciences and the arts. Here the ignition for transformation comes from an understanding of the "qualitative" and "quantitative" as a coherent whole. This requires a subtle shift of position for the arts and an embracing of a level of information literacy that moves through the Albertian window to create a new perspective on the world.

This presentation explores the importance of developing an understanding of data as a creative "material" and as a Rosetta Stone for unlocking transdisciplinary dialogues and collaborations.

 

Focus Group 2. Discuss transdiciplinary studio practice

PRESENTATION TITLE: Working Across Disciplinary and Cultural Borders in Australia and China

PRESENTER: Ross Harley

TITLE: Professor

AFFILIATION: National Institute of Experimental Arts; School of Media Arts, COFA, University of New South Wales.

PAPER ABSTRACT

For two weeks in September 2009 more than sixty art, design, and architecture students, practitioners and academics worked on a live design brief in an intensive two-week studio at Donghua University, Shanghai. e-SCAPE was a partnership between Professor Richard Goodwin"s Porosity Studio, and The Collabor8 Project (C8), in collaboration with Donghua University (Shanghai) and COFA (Sydney). This presentation will briefly outline some of the successes and challenges encountered in the process of working across disciplinary, cultural, and institutional boundaries.

 

PRESENTATION TITLE: construction of meaning in practice

PRESENTER: Peter Ride

TITLE: Principal Research Fellow

AFFILIATION: University of Westminster

PAPER ABSTRACT

Curating is increasingly an interdisciplinary activity and the boundaries of what can be considered to be "curatial practice" have changed. We can see that questions about curatorial practice that have been alive and well for many years in the new media field are increasingly being articulated as issues facing all areas of contemporary practice. However I argue that what often gets left out of the picture is the audience, and that in analysing what curatorial practice means we often concentrate on the place of the production at the expense of understanding meaning. Or more specifically how meaning is communicated to an audience. Using the term that is current in Visual Culture, what constitutes a "visual event"? Recent educational theories around fine arts practice-as-research suggest that we can see the construction of meaning in practice as a point of cognitive transference. I suggest that we can adapt these models and use them to explain the "visual event" when the audience meets the work and the entire construction of meaning as en example of cognitive transference.

 

Focus Group 3. Discuss transdisciplinary theory

 

PRESENTATION TITLE: Transdiscipilinary Occult

 

PRESENTER: Edward Colless

TITLE: Dr

AFFILIATION: Victorian College of the Arts University of Melbourne

PAPER ABSTRACT

 

Does the "transdisciplinary" adjective, then, offer an alternative or a distinction to interdisciplinary, institutional consensus? I believe it does, but in a way that requires criticism as well as endorsement. I propose that we theorize the "transdisciplinary" as a disruption to interdisciplinary conferring: that we encourage it as disagreement and, in a more demanding finesse of its alterity, as the "un-relation" of disciplines. There is some caution in this: do we not lose the prospect of academic cosmopolitanism, and its imperative of universality, when the interdisciplinary meeting place is disrupted? Let us think of the "transdisciplinary" disruption, however, not as a deregulation of academic discipline (as a cultural relativising of the arts and sciences meeting on equal ground), but as an irregularity within academic discipline; as an insurgency or "in-discipline" of academe.

 

I suggest, in response, that we use the prefix "trans" to suggest drift and errancy, as disciplines cross each other with the eventful possibility of collision or collusion but without the eventuality of their consensus. I would provocatively call this crossing an occultation, in that it induces an esoteric knowledge not manifestly conferrable, discernable or communicable. In this respect, the "transdisciplinary" induces an occulting of disciplinary research by an abnormality or unnaturalism, which is to say it offers a new manner of occult knowledge. Can we speculate, within our specialities of visual media for instance, on "transdisciplinary aesthetics" as such an occult vision? In the fugue-like drift of the "transdisciplinary" , could aesthetics become an occult science, or (in no way symmetrically or commensurately) could science become an occult aesthetics?

 

 

PRESENTATION TITLE: Title: 3 + 5 + 7 = 1 * Propagating Transdisciplinary Theory

PRESENTER: Wendy Coones

TITLE: Ms

AFFILIATION: Department for Image Science * Danube University Krems. Academic staff & coordinator of the MediaArtHistories, MA

PAPER ABSTRACT

The propagation and cultivation of an international field requires diverse and concerted efforts. Between formal education curricula, digital and print dissemination points, common research tools, national / international collaborations and continually developing interaction structures; a polycultural space can evolve. Taking into consideration the parameters of individual endeavors and their possible influence on one another, a larger image of the interconnectedness can be discussed.

 

Bios of the Moderators and Presenters

Edward Colless

Dr Edward Colless is Head of Critical and Theoretical Studies at the Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne. He has lectured in numerous institutions in art and cultural history, aesthetics, cinema studies, and design with practical teaching in performance. His publications include art criticism, reviewing, fiction and travel. He has also worked at various times as a professional theatre director, as a filmmaker, curator, journalist and architectural assistant. His most recent grant from the Australia Council has been in support of a writing project titled Hallucinogenesis, which deals with performativity and possession.

Wendy Coones

Wendy Coones studied Fine Arts at the San Francisco Art Institute and received her BFA during a time when new genres were being incorporated into the cutting edge of art school curricula. After

receiving an M.Ed. in Educational Research & Philosophy, she began working in museums as an exhibition developer of international cultural and scientific exhibits. Since 2005 she has been on the academic staff at the Department for Image Science responsible for curricula development, course realization and research. She has been on the Database of Virtual Art team since 2003 and was the founding web coordinator of the MediaArtHistory.org platform during her time at Humboldt University in Berlin.

Nina Czegledy

Nina Czegledy, award winning media artist, curator and educator works internationally on collaborative art& science& technology and educational projects. She has produced time based and digital projects and exhibited widely. Czegledy curated numerous international touring exhibitions, developed and presented in collaboration 18 international educational workshops and has lead and participated in forums, workshops and festivals worldwide. Her academic lectures lead to numerous international publications in books and journals. Czegledy is affiliated with KMDI, University of Toronto, Concordia University, Montreal, The University of Fine Arts, Budapest, the Moholy Nagy University of Design, Intercreate Org. and is a Member of the Governing Board of Leonardo/ISAST, Observatoire Leonardo des Arts des Techno-Sciences OLATS, Year 01, Media Arts Collective, Contributing Editor: Leonardo Electronic Almanac, President of the Critical Media Arts Society.

Petra Gemeinboeck

Petra Gemeinboeck explores the ambiguities and vulnerabilities in our relationships with machines, seeking to make tangible the desires and politics involved. Her practice in machine performance, interactive installation, and virtual environments engages participants in scenarios of encounter, in which they are provoked to negotiate, conspire with or even solicit a machine-generated co-performer. Often involving collaborators, her research spans the fields of architecture, computational creativity, new media arts, performance, robotics, textile design, and visual culture. Petra"s works have been exhibited internationally, including at the Ars Electronica, Archilab, Thessaloniki Biennale, MCA Chicago, ICC Tokyo, OK Center for Contemporary Art, and the Centre des Arts Enghien at Paris. She has also published widely on issues of interactivity and machine agency. Born in Vienna, Petra is currently based in Sydney, where she is a Senior Lecturer in Interactive Media Arts at the College of Fine Arts, University of NSW.

Ross Rudesch Harley

Ross Rudesch Harley is an artist and writer whose work has been presented at the Pompidou Centre in Paris, New York MoMA, Ars Electronica in Austria, and at the Sydney Opera House. He is also well-known for directing the audio/vision for the Cardoso Flea Circus videos and live performances with Colombian-born artist Maria Fernanda Cardoso. Recent work includes Aviopolis (with Gillian Fuller), a multimedia project and book about airports, Black Dog Publications, London; Busface, a photo-media installation with the Ejecutivo Colectivo exhibited at ArtBasel, Miami; and the DVD installation Cloudscope in collaboration with Durbach | Block architects at Elizabeth Bay House, Sydney. He is a former editor of the journal Art + Text, and has written regular columns on design and popular culture for Rolling Stone and for The Australian national newspaper. In 1992 he was the director of the Third International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA). He is Professor and Head of the School of Media Arts, College of Fine Arts at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

 

Mike Phillips

MIKE PHILLIPS is Professor of Interdisciplinary Arts at the University of Plymouth. R&D orbits digital architec-tures and transmedia publishing, and is manifest in a series of "Operating Systems" to dynamically manifest "data" as experience in order to enhance perspectives on a complex world. The Operating Systems project explores data as an abstract and invisible material that generates a dynamic mirror image of our biological, ecological and social activities.

Mike Phillips is director of i-DAT.org, an Arts Research Organisation that acts as a catalyst for creative innovation across the fields of Art, Science and Technology, facilitating regional, national and international collaborations and cultural projects. As a networked organisation and "cultural broker" i-DAT"s transdisciplinary agenda fosters "open innovation" and knowledge exchange between companies, institutions, communities and individuals. i-DAT is developing new "tools" for production, dissemination and participation that challenge traditional models of creation and consumption, and embrace the shifting relationships between audiences and cultural producers. i-DAT"s projects can be found on the i-DAT web site at: www.i-dat.org

 

Peter Ride

Peter Ride is Principal Research Fellow at The University of Westminster. He is course leader for MA Visual Culture and the MA Museums, Galleries and Contemporary Culture .

His research is centred around creative practice, in particular addressing digital media and interdisciplinary arts projects. He was one of the first curators in the UK to produce internet artworks. Recent curatorial projects include a retrospective, "David Rokeby -Silicon Remembers Carbon" in the UK and Canada (2007/8) and a group exhibition "Timeless: time, landscape and new media" (Toronto, 2005).

Previously he was employed at the National Museum of Photography, Film and TV, (1983-7) The Photographers" Gallery (1989-93), Cambridge Darkroom Gallery (1993-5), Artec, the Arts Technology Centre, London (1995-7) and DA2 Digital Arts Development Agency (1998-2000).

He is the co-author with Andrew Dewdney of "The New Media Handbook", Routledge, 2006.

Paul Thomas

Dr Paul Thomas, has a joint position as Associate Professor Head of Painting at the College of Fine Art, University of New South Wales and Head of Creative Technologies at the Centre for Culture and Technology, Curtin University. Paul has chaired numerous international conferences and is co-curting a show of Australian artists for ISEA2011. In 2000 Paul instigated and was the founding Director of the Biennale of Electronic Arts Perth.

Paul is an artist, curator, academic and writer who has been working in the area of electronic arts since 1981 when he co-founded the group Media-Space. Media-Space was part of the first global link up with artists connected to ARTEX. From 1981-1986 the group was involved in a number of collaborative exhibitions and was instrumental in the establishment a substantial body of research. Paul"s research project "Nanoessence" explored the space between life and death at a nano level. The project was part of an ongoing collaboration with the Nanochemistry Research Institute, Curtin University of Technology and SymbioticA at the University of Western Australia. The previous project "Midas" was researching at a nano level the transition phase between skin and gold. In 2009 he established Collaborative Research in Art Science and Humanity (CRASH) at Curtin http://crash.curtin.edu.au


The Leonardo Education and Art Forum Workshops

Leonardo Education and Art Forum: Transdisciplinary Visual Arts, Science & Technology Renewal Post-New Media Assimilation workshop

Sponsored by the National Institute for Experimental Arts and presented in collaboration with the ISEA2011 educational workshop led by Nina Czegledy

This workshop will address and share experiences and difficulties encountered while developing transdisciplinary art-science research, teaching, and when meshing curricula from diverse fields.

Dates:
Saturday, 17 September, 2011 - 13:00 - 16:00

Authors:
Paul Thomas

Location:
Sabanci Center, Levent
Sabanci Center, Room B

Workshop Moderator: Assoc. Prof. Paul Thomas

Workshop photos by Joel Louie



Workshop Leaders:
Focus Group 1. Discuss transdiciplinary colloborations: Petra  Gemeinboeck & Andres Burbano
Focus Group 2. Discuss transdiciplinary studio practice: Ross Harley and Ionat Zurr
Focus Group 3. Discuss transdisciplinary theory: Edward Colless and Wendy Coones
Transdisciplinarity is deemed 'radical', 'provisional and opportunistic' because it challenges traditional educational paradigms. It focuses critical and creative attention onto domain-specific problem areas of 'chance', 'discontinuity' and 'materiality' (Foucault, 1976) to transcend limits within established disciplinary knowledge practices. This enables (re)visioning of the role, activity and value of Art Schools in uniting the pedagogical and technological strengths of the humanities and sciences in a university context, utilising conceptual growth, experimental innovation, visual communication and flexible learning spaces to deliver a model of Transdisciplinarity.

The transdisciplinary model will be explored in the context of the trans-migratory role of ISEA and look for a different voice from the various constructed international institutional perspectives.

This workshop will address and share experiences and difficulties encountered while developing transdisciplinary art-science research, teaching, and when meshing curricula from diverse fields.

Each workshop leader will introduce their topic and the participants will be able to join one of the three groups  to discuss specific areas of focus (transdiciplinary colloborations, studio practice or theory) led by the panelists.

Each focus group will seek to identify and share ways to surmount some of the difficulties commonly encountered in interdisciplinary art/science practices and curricula with the aim of publishing effective transdiciplinary models and best practices.

Focus Group 1: Transdisciplinary Framework for Research Collaboration
Transdisciplinary Framework for Research Collaboration
by Dr. Petra  Gemeinboeck
This presentation will explore how historically experimental arts practices seem to be particularly privileged for opening up and navigating via transdisciplinarity such a complex, slippery terrain. Yet we haven't even opened “pandora's box” yet - asking the question of how transdisciplinary research can be practiced within the established institutional framework? This includes the issue of locating ones' research and related barriers with regards to funding and promotion. How can we develop and foster a horizontal, open transdisciplinary framework for research collaboration that perforates and transcends existing disciplinary boundaries within an institutional system where both resources and career paths are confined to vertically aligned, formally defined codes and practices?

Folding “papers” and unfolding projects
by Andres Burbano
The topic of my doctoral research is the “History of Media Technological Inventions in Latin America” it is based on the study case methodological approach. At the moment I am confronted with a series of interesting and profound questions related to the subject. When I explore the contents of this particular research at least ten general fields emerge as the key components of the theoretical study: History of Technology, Art History, Archaeology of the Media, Computation, Music Composition, Photography, Bioacoustics, Color Television, Space Missions and Latin American Studies.

The implications of such research are not insignificant especially considering the current interest in societies in Latin America in processes of innovation and technology, and media development. An understanding of the  “History of Media Technological Inventions in Latin America”  will be an important contribution to the understanding of Technology and Media in non-Western societies.

Additionally as a media arts practitioner myself I am in the process of creating practical media art projects based on the findings of the historical research, this condition adds more elements to the problems already there. All this complexity does not come as a surprise to me, however I must admit that while developing these kind of research/practice projects continuously see myself facing questions that initially I have no tools to answer. The most important task is the process of acquiring those tools needed.

Focus Group 2. Discuss transdiciplinary studio practice
Working Across Disciplinary and Cultural Borders in Australia and China
by Prof. Ross Harley
For two weeks in September 2009 more than sixty art, design, and architecture students, practitioners and academics worked on a live design brief in an intensive two-week studio at Donghua University, Shanghai. e-SCAPE was a partnership between Professor Richard Goodwin's Porosity Studio, and The Collabor8 Project (C8), in collaboration with Donghua University (Shanghai) and COFA (Sydney). This presentation will briefly outline some of the successes and challenges encountered in the process of working across disciplinary, cultural, and institutional boundaries.

Discipline Autonomy and Transdiciplinary
by Dr. Ionat Zurr
SymbioticA's Master of Biological Arts degree enables a situation in which students with an arts background take science units and students with scientific backgrounds must enrol to arts units, in their first year of study. The second year is dedicated to a transdiciplinary research. In the forum I will employ specific examples to discuss and unravel some of the issues concerned with the understandings and perceptions of what is “research” in the different disciplines, especially when the research include hands-on practice that involves life manipulation.

Focus Group 3. Discuss transdisciplinary theory
Transdiscipilinary Occult
by Dr. Edward Colless
Does the “transdisciplinary” adjective, then, offer an alternative or a distinction to interdisciplinary, institutional consensus? I believe it does, but in a way that requires criticism as well as endorsement. I propose that we theorize the “transdisciplinary” as a disruption to interdisciplinary conferring: that we encourage it as disagreement and, in a more demanding finesse of its alterity, as the “un-relation” of disciplines. There is some caution in this: do we not lose the prospect of academic cosmopolitanism, and its imperative of universality, when the interdisciplinary meeting place is disrupted? Let us think of the “transdisciplinary” disruption, however, not as a deregulation of academic discipline (as a cultural relativising of the arts and sciences meeting on equal ground), but as an irregularity within academic discipline; as an insurgency or “in-discipline” of academe.

I suggest, in response, that we use the prefix “trans” to suggest drift and errancy, as disciplines cross each other with the eventful possibility of collision or collusion but without the eventuality of their consensus. I would provocatively call this crossing anoccultation, in that it induces an esoteric knowledge not manifestly conferrable, discernable or communicable. In this respect, the “transdisciplinary” induces an occulting of disciplinary research by an abnormality or unnaturalism, which is to say it offers a new manner of occult knowledge. Can we speculate, within our specialities of visual media for instance, on “transdisciplinary aesthetics” as such an occult vision? In the fugue-like drift of the “transdisciplinary”, could aesthetics become an occult science, or (in no way symmetrically or commensurately) could science become an occult aesthetics?

Title: 3 + 5 + 7 = 1 * Propagating Transdisciplinary Theory
by Wendy Coones
The propagation and cultivation of an international field requires diverse and concerted efforts. Between formal education curricula, digital and print dissemination points, common research tools, national / international collaborations and continually developing interaction structures; a polycultural space can evolve. Taking into consideration the parameters of individual endeavors and their possible influence on one another, a larger image of the interconnectedness can be discussed.


Bios of the Presenters

Andres Burbano
Andres Burbano, originally from Colombia, explores the interactions of science, art and technology in various capacities: as a researcher, as an individual artist and in collaborations with other artists, designers and engineers. Burbano's work ranges from documentary video (in both science and art), sound and telecommunication art to the exploration of algorithmic cinematic narratives. The broad spectrum of his work illustrates the importance, indeed, the prevalence, of interdisciplinary collaborative work in the field of digital art.
Andres Burbano is currently a PhD candidate of Media Arts and Technology at the University of California Santa Barbara.

Edward Colless
Dr. Edward Colless is Head of Critical and Theoretical Studies at the Victorian College of the Arts, University of Melbourne. He has lectured in numerous institutions in art and cultural history, aesthetics, cinema studies, and design with practical teaching in performance. His publications include art criticism, reviewing, fiction and travel. He has also worked at various times as a professional theatre director, as a filmmaker, curator, journalist and architectural assistant. His most recent grant from the Australia Council has been in support of a writing project titled Hallucinogenesis, which deals with performativity and possession.

Wendy Coones
Wendy Coones studied Fine Arts at the San Francisco Art Institute and received her BFA during a time when new genres were being incorporated into the cutting edge of art school curricula.  After receiving an M.Ed. in Educational Research & Philosophy, she began working in museums as an exhibition developer of international cultural and scientific exhibits. Since 2005 she has been on the academic staff at the Department for Image Science responsible for curricula development, course realization and research. She has been on the Database of Virtual Art team since 2003 and was the founding web coordinator of the MediaArtHistory.org platform during her time at Humboldt University in Berlin.

Petra  Gemeinboeck
Petra  Gemeinboeck explores the ambiguities and vulnerabilities in our relationships with machines, seeking to make tangible the desires and politics involved. Her practice in machine performance, interactive installation, and virtual environments engages participants in scenarios of encounter, in which they are provoked to negotiate, conspire with or even solicit a machine-generated co-performer.  Often involving collaborators, her research spans the fields of architecture, computational creativity, new media arts, performance, robotics, textile design, and visual culture. Petra's works have been exhibited internationally, including at the Ars Electronica, Archilab, Thessaloniki Biennale, MCA Chicago, ICC Tokyo, OK Center for Contemporary Art, and the Centre des Arts Enghien at Paris. She has also published widely on issues of interactivity and machine agency. Born in Vienna, Petra is currently based in Sydney, where she is a Senior Lecturer in Interactive Media Arts at the College of Fine Arts, University of NSW.

Ross Rudesch Harley
Ross Rudesch Harley is an artist and writer whose work has been presented at the Pompidou Centre in Paris, New York MoMA, Ars Electronica in Austria, and at the Sydney Opera House. He is also well-known for directing the audio/vision for the Cardoso Flea Circus videos and live performances with Colombian-born artist Maria Fernanda Cardoso. Recent work includes Aviopolis (with Gillian Fuller), a multimedia project and book about airports, Black Dog Publications, London; Busface, a photo-media installation with the Ejecutivo Colectivo exhibited at ArtBasel, Miami; and the DVD installation Cloudscope in collaboration with Durbach | Block architects at Elizabeth Bay House, Sydney. He is a former editor of the journal Art + Text, and has written regular columns on design and popular culture for Rolling Stone and for The Australian national newspaper. In 1992 he was the director of the Third International Symposium on Electronic Art (ISEA). He is Professor and Head of the School of Media Arts, College of Fine Arts at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Ionat Zurr
Dr. Ionat Zurr is an Artist, researcher and a curator as well as the Academic Coordinator of SymbioticA - The Centre of Excellence in Biological Arts, School of Anatomy and Human Biology, the University of Western Australia.  She has been an artist in residence in the School of Anatomy and Human Biology since 1996 and was central to the establishment of SymbioticA in 2000. Ionat developed and runs the world unique postgraduate programme in Biological Arts. Ionat together with Oron Catts formed the internationally renowned Tissue Culture and Art Project. She is considered a pioneer in the field of biological arts and her research been published widely, exhibited internationally and her artwork has been collected by MoMA New York.. Ionat have been a fellow in the InStem Institute, NCBS, Bangalore (2010) and a visiting scholar at The Experimental Art Centre, Stanford University (2007) and The Tissue Engineering & Organ Fabrication Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School (2000-2001). She exhibited in places such as the MoMA NY, Mori Museum Tokyo, Ars Electronica, Linz, GOMA Brisbane and more


Contemporary Imaging Symposium

Collaborative Research in Art, Science and Humanities (CRASH) Symposium at Staffroom
School of Art and Design Exhibition, hosted by School of Design and Art.

Theme: Contemporary Imaging
Date: Friday 9 September 2011
Time: 1pm -5.30pm Symposium, 6pm Staffroom School of Art and Design Exhibition Opening
Venue: The Moores Building Art Gallery, Level 1, 46 Henry St, Fremantle

Listen to a podcast of this sympoium.

'Contemporary Imaging'  Symposium will expand on previous Symposia which were held on annual basis since 2007 and extend the discussions of technologies and how they impact on the contemporary image and the construction of culture.

The discussion will provide an opportunity to reflect on some of the issues confronting researchers, creative practitioners and educators which the presentations will highlight and inspire further engagement, collaboration and research in this rapidly evolving field.

Presentations
1.00 -1.05 Introduction
Dr Julian Goddard, Senior Lecturer and Head of School, School of Design and Art, Curtin University

1.05 -1.25 Nanoshifts -Reconfiguration of Material Agency
Dr Paul Thomas, Associate Professor Senior, Department of Art, School of Design and Art, Curtin University
The presentation will focus on research in the area Nanotechnology and the role that it is having in redirecting the way we sense the material world. The focus on how art is rethinking its ocularcentrisity and the agency of its material constructs. The privileged position that art has held is being challenged by nanotechnology; confronting the very core of its relationship with the material world.

1.25 -1.45 Thinktank: Future ARI Generator
Dr Darryn Ansted, Coordinator of Painting, Department of Art, School of Design and Art, Curtin University
This presentation outlines the transformation of a nondescript triangular room in Bentley into a cutting edge research space that will contribute to the broader community and aid in the training of curators.

1.45 -1.55 Beyond the Limits of Traditional Visual Computing Models
Joel Louie, PhD Candidate, Department of Art, School of Design and Art,
Curtin University
The Graphical User Interface has been the dominant paradigm for decades but the modern interface approaches like multi-touch (Apple iOS), gestural (Nintendo Wii) and movement tracking (Microsoft Kinect) herald an exciting time for alternative interaction modalities. Joel Louie's research explores the Tangible User Interface (TUI) through the corporeal frameworks articulated by movement theorist Rudolf Laban's concepts of “touch” and “effort shape” and phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty's notion of “the phenomenal body”.

1.55 -2.05 Data and Imaging Technology
 Bryan J Mather, Ph D Candidate, Department of Art, School of Design and Art, Curtin University
Bryan Mather's research explores computer language structure and its effect on digital reality. This paper examines the dominant view that places “data” as separate from the algorithmic translation of data; that data is a collection of facts or truths that we reinterpret or mediate into images. Notions of truth and data, and offer a view on the critique of the image and its relationship to the underlying technologies.

2.05 -2.10 Questions and Comments

2.10 -2.35 Break

2.35 -2.55 Imagining and Imaging the Other Side of the World.
Susanna Castleden, Lecturer and Coordinator of Printmedia, Department of Art, School of Design and Art, Curtin University. PhD Candidate at RMIT University)
This presentation looks at ways in which the world has been imaged and imagined through a variety of mapping processes. I examine a series of maps and artworks as a way of reflecting on how we interpret and understand the visible and invisible world given the current accessibility and abundance of new mapping technologies.

2.55 -3.05 Transmuted Signal: The image as information channel
Jan Lawrence Andruszkiewicz, M Phil Candidate,  Department of Art, School of Design and Art, Curtin University
Jan Andruszkiewicz's research focuses on Information complexity and creative practice. In his exegesis he deals with how to re-imagne visual information complexity. He takes a creative approach to information entropy, perception, identification and understanding.

3.05 -3.25 Multiple-Views our Problematic Contemporary Relationship to Reality
Nicole Slatter, Lecturer and Co-coordinator of First Year, Department of Art, School of Design and Art, Curtin University and PhD Candidate, RMIT
This paper will discuss the work of Pierre Huyghe and the process of developing understandings of place through multiple formats and visualisations. Contemporary experiences of place are impacted by variety of image and information sources available to describe narrative, time and space.

3.25 -3.30 Questions and Comments

3.30 -3.55 Break

3.55 -4.15 Spatial Representation in Architecture -Spatial Communication
hrough the Use of Sound
 Errol L Tout, PhD, Senior Lecturer, Department of Architecture and Interior Architecture, Curtin University
Dr Errol Tout suggests that Architecture is not only a visual and physical phenomenon but also an instrument that tempers and constructs our sound perceptions of the world. This working premise draws our attention to the significance of how 'aural representation' contributes to forming an understanding of a work of architecture and how architectural space conditions not only how we see the world but also how we hear it. Can sound be used to tell audience things about space that, perhaps, images cannot?

 4.15 -4.35 Architecture & the Ornamental - Two Current Projects
 Pam Gaunt, Senior Lecturer and Academic Coordinator, Department of Art, School of Design and Art, Curtin University
Pam Gaunt's presentation will focus on two projects she is currently working on with Donaldson & Warn architects and PlanE Landscape Architects in building integrated art work in Kings Park. Both projects involve cutting edge interventions in/with technology such as electrochromic glass.

 4.35 - 4.55 Radical Pleasure
 Dr Julian Goddard, Senior Lecturer and Head of School, School of Design and Art, Curtin University
This paper looks at the recent collapse of the boundaries between of Art/Design/Architecture and argues for the reinstatement of a radical praxis within the everyday through an old school Marxist critique of production and consumption. The twist in the argument is in the way in which this new attack on consumption is framed -not through revolutionary emancipatory rhetoric but through a reinvigoration of the subversive potential of pleasure. 'If it feels good it must be good!'

 4.55 -5.00 Questions and Comments

 5.00 -5.30 Discussion

 5.30pm Close

6pm Please join us for the Official Opening of the Staffroom Exhibition.


New Imaging: transdisciplinary strategies for art beyond the new media.

Takes place on 5 6 November at Artspace, 43/51 Cowper Wharf Rd, Sydney, NSW 2011.

A profound shift is occurring in our understanding of postmodern media culture. Since the turn of the millennium the emphasis on mediation as technology and as aesthetic idiom, as opportunity for creative initiatives and for critique, has become increasingly normative and doctrinaire. Mediation and the new media arts have in fact become the new medium of critical and pedagogical discourse: like water is for fish, like culture is for cultural studies, mediation is a concept that is taken for granted now because it is itself the medium in which we think and act, in which we swim. We need a concept that is amphibian, and that can leave its medium. The concept we propose is a remediated apprehension of the image: an active image and activity of imaging beyond the boundaries of disciplinary definition, but also altering the relations of intermedia aesthetics and interdisciplinary pedagogy. This concept will need to incorporate a vibrant materialism of the image's sensory and cognitive strata and an evanescent immaterialism of its affective qualities. Rather than locate our conference in the space of negotiation between disciplines or media (the "inter-"), we propose the opposition, transit and surpassing of the interdisciplinary by a "transdisciplinary aesthetics", and its conceptual and physical practice of a "transdisciplinary imaging."

The aim of the conference is to bring together artists, scholars, scientists historians and curators.

The conference will explore areas related to: Painting, Drawing, Film, Video, Photography, Computer visualization, Real-time imaging, Intelligent systems, Image Science.

Conference chairs

Associate Professor Su BAKER and Associate Professor Paul THOMAS

Conference Committee

Brad BUCKLEY :: Brogan BUNT :: Ted COLLESS :: Ernest EDMONDS :: Petra GEMEINBOECK:: Julian GODDARD :: Ross HARLEY :: Martyn JOLLY :: Daniel MAFE :: David THOMAS

Conference Partners

UNSW COFA, VCA University of Melbourne, Artspace

Conference Sponsors

Australian National University, Curtin University, Queensland University of Technology, RMIT University, University of Sydney, Sydney College of the Arts, University of Technology Sydney, University of Wollongong.

More information >>


3D Visualisation: a Continuing Discussion
Monday June 13th 2011
12.00 noon to 4.00 pm
Venue: ARRC Auditorium, 26 Dick Perry Avenue, Kensington, WA

Following on from the highly successful symposium of 11th April 2011, the aim of this meeting is to present  both applications and research into visualisation for scientific and educational and artistic purposes.

In a discussion session we will consider how these examples might offer inspiration for further research, development and application.

 

Presentations

12.00 - 12.30                  Refreshments

12.30 - 1.00                   Introduction                 

Valerie Maxville, Education Program Leader, iVEC
Suzette Worden, Professor of Design, Department of Design, School of Design & Art, Curtin University
Tony Rickards, Senior Lecturer, Science and Mathematics Education Centre, Curtin University

1.00 - 2.15                  Presentations                  

Visualising the Brain with EEG
Tele Tan, Associate Professor, Department of Computing, Curtin University

Dynamic Depictions Distract
Ric Lowe, Professor of Learning Technologies, School of Education, Curtin University

Art, Philosophy and Positional Computation
Chris Thorne, UWA, Curtin University, VRShed Pty Ltd

2.15 - 2.30                  Break

2.30 - 3.20                  Presentations                 

Auspex Australis - an Art and Science Collaboration
David Carson, Inter-media artist, Fremantle, WA

Stereoscopic Imaging: Reporting on Work in Progress
Andrew Woods, Research Fellow, Centre for Marine Science & Technology, Faculty of Science & Engineering, Curtin University

3.20 - 4.00                  Discussion

4.00                  Close

All Welcome

RSVP - for catering purposes - email: rsvp@ivec.org or call 6436 8830 with your name and contact details.

 

 

Further information please download full program>>>>>

 


3D visualisation: evolution of thought
Monday April 11th 2011
12.00 noon to 4.00 pm
Venue: ARRC Auditorium, 26 Dick Perry Avenue, Kensington, WA


The premise for this meeting is that further applications of 3D visualisation can be identified by pooling resources and ideas from existing projects. We invite you to consider a range of 3D visualisations that present exciting and innovative solutions for scientific and educational purposes and to join us in discussing how these might offer inspiration for further research, development and application.
We propose that collaborative solutions may have more potential and broader application than the original aims and outcomes of a project. In this meeting we test this premise and aim to identify transferable aspects for further development.
After the presentations we invite you to join the discussion and:

Research into the relationship between 3D virtual environments and material culture or physical environments is an area with many potential solutions that have not yet reached their full potential. Further research outcomes might therefore involve exploring questions about body and space, movement, performance, experience, narrative, reality and illusion.

 

Download program


strange futures: collaborations that make nano-art Symposium

 

Crash Founding Director talks at the symposium

 

Sunday 7 February 2010
Location: BankWest Lecture Theatre, John Curtin Gallery

 

Presented in association with the art in the age of nanotechnology exhibition by the John Curtin Gallery and Collaborative Research in Art, Science and Humanity (in association with the Perth International Arts Festival).The symposium investigated how nano-art affects our perception of the material world. Invited artists and scientists discussed their research and projects and the nature and successes of interdisciplinary collaborations.

 

Keynote speaker Dr Colin Milburn, Associate Professor of English, University of California, Davis

 

Keynote speaker Dr Colin Milburn

Dr Colin Milburn is a Professor of English and member of the Science & Technology Studies Program at the University of California, Davis. His research focuses on the cultural intersections between science, literature, and media technologies. Having been trained as a historian of science, a literary theorist, and a molecular biologist, he is particularly interested in the ways that laboratory research and popular media influence each other.  He has written about the social imagination of nanotechnology in his book Nanovision: Engineering the Future (Duke University Press, 2008).  He is currently completing a new book about the convergence of video games and the molecular sciences, entitled Mondo Nano: Fun and Games in the World of Digital Matter.

 

Speakers

Speakers included Dr Christa Sommerer & Dr Laurent Mignonneau, (Professors, University of Arts and Industrial Design, Linz, Austria), Dr Paul Thomas (CRASH Founding Director), Oron Catts (Artistic Director, SymbioticA, University of Western Australia) and Professor Mike Phillips, (Digital Art & Technology, University of Plymouth)

Dr Christa Sommerer & Dr Laurent Mignonneau

Dr Christa Sommerer & Dr Laurent Mignonneau take questions from the floor

Dr Christa Sommerer & Dr Laurent Mignonneau take questions from the floor

Professor Mike Phillps talks about his work mote

Professor Mike Phillips discusses issues of scale.

connections are made during the breaks

Local and international artists and scientists gather.

strange futures 2

Works from the forces magnitudes workshop were on display during the breaks.

during the breaks works from the forces/magnitudes images were shown